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20130113
20130121
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KRCB (PBS) 4
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Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 5:30pm PST
the inauguration of president obama, our daily download team-- lauren ashburn and howard kurtz, talk to the man who designed the winning side's digital strategy. >> joining us is harper reed, a high tech executive who served as chief technology officer for president obama's reelection campaign. welcome, harper. >> hello. >> hello. >> we spent a year talking about the role of social media in the campaign. how important were twitter, facebook, and +*eupbs gram to e campaign? >> well, it was -- it's interesting to look at 2008 versus 2012. because in 2008 things were just starting -- >> pelley: . >> they were new toys. >> people weren't using them. i like to say like my mom wasn't using them, you know? as more people use these, as more people -- america starts using these they're incredibly important, as you can imagine. >> and are they important because when you get friends or followers on facebook or twitter or tumble -r, amplifying the campaign's message, is that better than hearing it from a politician? >> i think it's more genuine. if i share with you and you're friends on facebook you listen to
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 10:00pm PST
't use that in talking to a reporter because the humor that was done on the barack obama campaign's tumbler and all of those things, i loved it. >> but it could be off message. you go through these intense campaign, you've got thousands of e-mails then you unplugged no internet for a week. what did youern from that experience, harper? >> i set out -- i realized i was addicted to e-mail. i think we all tra v that. i was at dinner with my wife and i was like "just a second." >> what are you talking about? i don't know what you mean! >> so i realized that we went from getting thousands of e-mails to suddenly like ten and it was a little bit -- i think there's a lot of ego in technology and so it's a little bit like i was like aren't i important? what happened? what happened? >> so you decided to opt out? >> i wanted to just put a distance between that part of my life and what was coming up next because i figured it's going to ramp up again but i wanted to have this tiny bit of time where i could just read. >> tell our viewers what was the best thing you read when you unplugged? >> i
PBS
Jan 14, 2013 11:00pm PST
conference that president obama and karzai had i think talked about t you know, that we have every intention of playing a positive role in a one state because we want it for ourselves more than for the afghans. it is not very generous t is a very, very selfish desire not to have an extremist group take pog we are in afghanistan because that would inspire extremists within pakistan also, because it would inspire extremists in pakistan also and pakistan interestingly, despite whatever images pakistan may send, pakistan is a country of 180 million people which has always, always elected mainstream political parties, which has always elected secularly oriented political parties. pakistan's father of the nation, was a secular man. he taught to us allow people to go to their churches, to their-- so we have to see what went wrong and what went wrong was really a series of disrupting the democratic process and disrupting the political maturity and the institution building et cetera. and we hope that as a first transition of democratic regime to another takes place in just two months. that's when the
PBS
Jan 17, 2013 11:00pm PST
this. and the europeans. >> rose: i thank you for taking time to come talk with us about this. >> thanks so much, charlie, pleasure. >> just to put this into the context not just of africa but of the broader fight against al qaeda, because president obama has often said that al qaeda is on its way to defeat and it's probably true that the central al qaeda ornization which was one headed by osama bin laden and headquartered in pakistan probably matter a lot less now than a few years ago but what you have seen is that as we pit al qaeda in the core area in afghanistan and pakistan it splintered outward and moved outward. and now are you seeing, you know, like a virus trying to find a body in which it can find a weak host. it's moving out and becoming more powerful in places like yemen, somalia, libya, now mali. so it's moving further and further a field and there are so many weak states because this is where terrorists te rt. they take root in failed states there are so many failed states in africa it is not just mali there are a lot of other places and now increasingly in north
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4